Letters2Amy Exhibition [2018]

Thrilled to be collaborating with the Amy Winehouse Foundation, the UK Department for International Trade, The Great Britain Campaign and our brilliant creative director Phil Griffin to develop, produce, and distribute this touring exhibition and showcase designed to celebrate the legacy of a true music icon—Amy Winehouse.  More details to be announced in the upcoming months.

This Holiday Season… We’re lending a hand.

We’re proud of the latest campaign we created for the amazing non-profit A Better Balance—called Family Leave Works.  And we’re even more proud to help spread their message this holiday season in support of New York State’s ground-breaking paid family leave law which goes into effect January 1st, 2018. You can learn more about the amazing work they do by visiting www.FamilyLeaveWorks.org.

You can help too with a simple Tweet or Post of support…

I support #FamilyLeaveWorks and paid family leave.
Learn more at FamilyLeaveWorks.org

Microsoft & Golden Dawn Arkestra [2017]

Gabriel Gornell and LocoDistro are excited to be collaborating with Microsoft this fall—consulting and providing music entertainment for their Travel Summit in legendary music city—Austin, Texas.

Equally thrilled to be working with Austin’s own funk-jazz futurists Golden Dawn Arkestra. Keep Austin Weird!

Pirate Studios UK [2017]

Provide on-going executive-level council to the London-based music studio brand (currently with 9 locations across the UK) in areas of business strategy, brand strategy + expansion planning with regard to their North American roll-out beginning in 2017.

Strategic initiatives included:
– Target Analysis + Segmentation (both Consumer + B to B)
– Buying Criteria Analysis (both Consumer + B to B)
– Competitive Analysis + White space Mapping
—Oversight of Studio Set Up + Equipment Bidding
– Messaging Strategy
—Special Event & Sponsorship Initiatives like SXSW

 

SXSW 2017

We’re off to SXSW tomorrow (March 13) with our new client Pirate Studios who (with an ‘artist-first’ approach) is reinventing rehearsal studios for the music industry globally.

We’ll also be taking meetings on behalf of client JA Films (#RollingStones, #Adele, #EdSheeran).

Meet with us at the @Live4everMedia Lounge at the Omni.  Email GabrielGornell@LocoDistro.com if you wanna meet up to talk music branding, distribution, and 360º packaging.

Branding your Music— 6 reasons for Consistency.

Written by Gabriel Gornell

Gabriel Gornell is a branding, production, and distribution executive who has worked with countless artists that range from The Rolling Stones to Oscar the Grouch.

If your band’s attractive lead singer gets 300 likes for every pouty pic on Instagram—but you struggle to get 50 people to come to your gigs—you’ve got great reach but terrible impact. Same holds true for established acts just a few years out of their prime who have a respectable Facebook following—but struggle to get decent festival bookings.

Of course there are many factors involved in branding your music project (like the actual music for instance) but this post focuses on the importance of consistency.

Across the go-to social platforms, messaging from both established acts and emerging acts compete against millions of posts from hundreds of thousands of artists. Snoop Dogg alone puts up 5-10 Instagrams per day.

Further complicating, even if you do break through the clutter, ‘likes’ and ‘follows’ aren’t the only measure of your branding success. Don’t get us wrong—the reach you can get from Instagram, Snapchat, and Facebook is awesome. But reach is not the same thing as impact. So how can your posts possibly stand out? Have any impact? And how can you convert ‘likes’ to ‘listens’ on a distribution platform like SoundCloud? This article explains why consistency helps.

The Van Halen logo will be our obvious example. This mark has changed very little since 1978, and regardless of who’s singing—it represents the Van Halen brand. Almost 40 years later, the Van Halen brand is so strong—they’ve survived 3 singers, internal feuds, Wolfgang on bass, and lots more. Obviously they back up their brand-promise with a guitar god, Diamond Dave, classic records, and a great mythology that all work together. But for the most part—long before social media mattered— they’ve been consistent with regard to their identity materials. They’ve actually been more consistent than The Rolling Stones who create a new tongue treatment for every tour and every album. In a sense, Van Halen has become the Coca-Cola of Rock n’ Roll branding. And here is why Van Halen-like consistency will help your music project.

Reason #1 The most obvious benefit of consistency is increased awareness because the more your audience is exposed to your brand—the better their chances of remembering it. And simply put, if you keep changing it there is less chance your audience will remember it. ‘Effective frequency’ is the marketing lingo for this. Understanding all the competition and clutter out there—even the old advertising ‘Rule of 7’ probably isn’t enough anymore.

The Rule of 7 states that a customer needs to “hear” a marketing message at least 7 times before they’ll buy that product or service.

Today most marketing experts put effective frequency numbers much higher than just 7 times. But wherever you think it is for your particular audience (7 times, 20x, 100x) one thing everyone generally agrees on is that messages are more effective when repeated. So don’t waste your brand impressions by being inconsistent!

The benefit of effective frequency and consistency working together is true across all entertainment mediums. Have you ever seen a televised award show where the show logo is different in the on-air promos, the step-and-repeat, and the animated show open? One show with three logos happens more than you’d expect (not mentioning any producer names). Not surprising, the network then wonders why their unaided awareness numbers are slipping. Partially they’re slipping because televised award shows have become boring as shit. But it’s also because their brand team doesn’t keep a watchful eye—and their effective frequency is watered down by inconsistent branding.

Reason #2 Consistency conveys your identity and attitude. A focused effort to establish and maintain consistent branding across all your touchpoints (social, website, SoundCloud page, EPKs, etc.) will deliver a specific set of impressions. Do you follow through? Will you deliver a decent bar tab? Will you get the ratings? Will you sell the tickets?

Reason #3 Consistency helps you manage perceptions. By thinking deliberately about your brand message and what you’re trying to accomplish—you control how people perceive your music project. This goes beyond your fans—it also helps manage what promoters, venues, labels, and sponsors think of you.

Reason #4 Consistency connotes professionalism and stability. Let’s be honest—labels, promoters, distribution partners, and sponsors hate instability. In 2017, even Guns N’ Roses show up on time—and all of their current materials reference their ‘Not In This Lifetime’ tour with impressive consistency. So act like a stable organization!

Reason #5 Consistency eliminates issues surrounding brand confusion. For many emerging music acts (especially emerging DJs… no digs intended), their branding is actually more of a hindrance than a help. A consistent brand should instill confidence rather than prompt confusion. Which EDM artist was that again?

Reason #6 Consistency protects your investment. Without established brand standards—many labels, managers, and producers will spend thousands of dollars building a brand—only to have it degraded by inconsistent and sloppy application. Build equity in your brand by being consistent and build upon previous successes.

In a nutshell, be Van Halen. Be consistent.

 

Tell me what you want. What you really really want.

The first step in defining your music brand. Early in my career (which started in advertising way before social media) we were taught to memorize Ogilvy’s definition of a brand.

“The intangible sum of a product’s attributes: its name, packaging, and price, its history, its reputation, and the way it’s advertised.” —David Ogilvy

Many years later, this simple yet telegraphic definition is still the best. And it holds true regardless of whether the brand is a toothpaste or a rock band— though for bands, there are some obvious additions to the list. Regardless… how do you define and guide an emerging brand/band when most of these elements aren’t yet known? By writing down what it is that you want!

For us—Every successful distribution plan. Every marketing plan. Every identity plan. And every concert film starts with some basic branding exercises. And if your brand isn’t yet defined, start by telling us what you want. Give us your top ten.

For any emerging artist or music project we urge you to start by simply making a list of the top ten things that you’d like to accomplish. And there are no wrong answers!

  • Release a record
  • Sell my concert film to Netflix
  • Put $100K into a savings account within 18 months.
  • Write 20 new songs
  • Book two gigs per month
  • Whatever they are, they are!

The music side of the entertainment business is a challenging winding journey to say the least. So give your projects their best chance by clearly defining your goals upfront—so that you may then develop strong strategic plans to accomplish those goals.

From a sales and distribution standpoint—clearly defining where you’re going and how you’re going to get there will soon be as much of your brand as your music.

(Funny aside, I actually shot a commercial for the Spice Girls dolls during my advertising years. They are probably worth a ton today!)

 

JA Films [2016-Present]

Excited to provide on-going distribution, packaging, and brand consulting  to the leading UK production company—JA Films.

Founded in 2009, JA Films (formerly known as JA Digital) is an award-winning, creative-led production company run by industry expert, Julie Jakobek. We exist to produce captivating films and content for global cinema events, DVD, TV and digital.

JA Films employs world class producers, directors, creatives and technicians, each team carefully selected for each production. Multi-award winning director Paul Dugdale is JA Films lead director and recent films have led to two Grammy nominations in the Best Music Film category and further nominations and wins in the Best Music Film, Best Live Coverage and Best Music Programme categories.

MAP Records, Nashville [2016]

Provided executive-level support in areas of business strategy, brand strategy + distribution counsel to the Country-focused music-tech initiative based out of Nashville, TN.

Strategic initiatives included:

– Target Analysis + Segmentation (both Consumer + B to B)
– Buying Criteria Analysis (both Consumer + B to B)
– Competitive Analysis + White space Mapping
– Messaging Strategy

Tactical initiatives included:

360 ̊ Distribution Strategy and Message Planning in areas of Events, Digital Distribution, Cross-platform, Physical Distribution, Video Distribution, PR, Social Media, List Management, and Advertising.

Gabriel Gornell

gabe_masksEntertainment Architect

A seasoned, results-driven, corporate-process anarchist—Gabriel creates disruptive strategies and solutions for artists and entertainment businesses by offering unconventional approaches to concept development, entertainment branding, 360° distribution, and production. As a passionately independent content creator—Gabriel is a Sundance winner, 2x Worldfest Gold winner, Adweek BestSpots winner, and a featured filmmaker at the MoMA.

As Executive Producer, Gabriel has worked closely with such entertainment brands as Discovery, HBO, History, Lionsgate, Marvel (including Avengers, Hulk, Spiderman, X-Men), Nat Geo, NBC, Scripps, Starz, and Turner—as well as with music icons including DeBarge/Bunny DeBarge, Doug E. Fresh, Il Volo, InnerPartySystem, Chris Isaak, Wynonna Judd, Alison Krauss, Tim McGraw, Oscar the Grouch & Anderson Cooper (Emmy duet), Dolly Parton, Smokey Robinson, Kenny Rogers, Lionel Richie, and The Rolling Stones.

In 2012, Gabriel was selected by the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences to be Executive Producer of “The 39th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards” (broadcast live on Turner/HLN) to reinvent the classic Emmy brand—overseeing every element of the event, production, telecast (distribution), and branding. Also in 2012, Gabriel served as Executive Producer along side Spike Lee on the music-themed hip hop horror movie “You’re Nobody til Somebody Kills You” distributed by Lionsgate. In 2013, Gabriel returned as Executive Producer of “The 40th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards” to record media impressions.

As a distributor, between 2011 and 2016, he acquired such pictures for sales & distribution as “For Greater Glory” with Andy Garcia and Eva Longoria, “Hotel Noir” with Danny DeVito, Mandy Moore, and Rosario Dawson, “Girl Walks Into A Bar” with Carla Gugino, Zach Quinto, Danny DeVito, Josh Hartnett and Emmanuelle Chriqui, “The Hot Potato” with Ray Winstone and Jack Huston, and “Roadie” with Ron Eldard, Bobby Cannavale, and Jill Hennessy.

Other executive credits include “Last Stand of the 300” (Top 10 Best Sword Fighting Movie of All Time, Star Wars Insider Magazine, Feb 2012), “Kenny Rogers First 50 Years” (GAC & BBC International 2011), “Tyrannosaurus Sex” (Top 10 Must List, Entertainment Weekly, 2010), “Battle BC” (3 of 4 Stars, People Magazine, 2009), “Journey to 10,000 BC” (History, 2008), “The Wire” (HBO, 2007), and “Rome Engineering an Empire” (Emmy Winner, 2005).

Branding highlights include roles as advertising Creative Director for Mudd Jeans from 2004- 2005 helping the brand peak in sales to almost $1 billion per year at retail. He was also Creative Director for The Rolling Stones overseeing their merchandising marketing in 2005-06 during the album and tour A Bigger Bang which delivered almost $250 million in merchandising sales. In varying agency and direct-to-client capacities, Gabriel has worked with such brands as Canon, Ford, Godiva, Hasbro, Shiseido, Starbucks, Mercedes-Benz, and more.

Presently, Gabriel maintains both indie and high-profile clients in music, television, and technology. Notable projects include developing NY Times bestseller “I’m with the Band” by Pamela Des Barres into a feature film and representing the highly acclaimed music documentary following the The Rolling Stones through South America and Cuba entitled Olé Olé Olé!: A Trip Across Latin America. Gabriel’s process and involvement directly led to the 2017 television distribution deal in the US.